Home » 2019 ANNUAL MEETING » Pre-Conference Workshops, International Networking Forum, Evening Poster Session, NIDA International Poster Session, and Opening Reception

Pre-Conference Workshops, International Networking Forum, Evening Poster Session, NIDA International Poster Session, and Opening Reception

Pre-Conference (PC) Workshops

The Society for Prevention Research provides training opportunities in prevention science during pre-conference workshops scheduled for Tuesday, May 28, 2019.  All workshops require registration.

  1. Pre-Conference Workshop I (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:30 pm: Improving the Efficiency of Longitudinal Research Using Responsive and Adaptive Survey Design Techniques (To register select: Longitudinal)
  2. Pre-Conference Workshop II (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:30 pm: Novel Approaches for Public Health Informatics: Integrating and Analyzing Geospatial and Administrative Data (To register select: Health Informatics)
  3. Pre-Conference Workshop III (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:30 pm: Difficult Dialogues in Prevention Science: Improving Engagement, Research, and Pedagogy on Controversial Topics or with Vulnerable Populations (To register select: Difficult Dialogues)
  4. Pre-Conference Workshop IV (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:30 pm: Prevention through Partnership: Translating Evidence to and from Practice through Research-Practice Partnerships (To register select: Prevention through Partnerships)
  5. Pre-Conference Workshop V (half-day), 1:00 pm – 5:30 pm: How to write a research grant application to the Institute of Education Sciences: (IES) Bringing Prevention Science Ideas to Education Research, Presented by IES, U.S. DOE (To register select: IES grant writing)

Pre-conference Workshop Registration Rates

Registration Type Early Bird On or Before 5/6/2019 Full Registration On or Before 5/24/2019 Onsite
PC Workshops I and II (Discounted rate underwritten by NIH/Office of Disease Prevention), Member and Non-Member $37.50 $43.75  

$50

PC Workshops I and II (Discounted rate underwritten by NIH/Office of Disease Prevention, Student (Member and Non-Member) $18.75 $25 $31.25
PC Workshops III and IV, Member and Non-Member $150 $175 $200
PC Workshops III and IV, Student (Member and Non-Member) $75 $100 $125
PC Workshop V, Member and Non-Member, Presented by the IES, U.S. DOE Free Free Free
PC Workshop V, Student (Member and Non-Member), Sponsored by the IES, U.S. DOE Free Free Free

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Pre-Conference Workshop I (full-day)

Date:     Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Time:    8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Improving the Efficiency of Longitudinal Research Using Responsive and Adaptive Survey Design Techniques (To register select: Longitudinal)

Underwritten by:  NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Organizers and Presenters: 

  • Brady T. West, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
  • James Wagner, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Description:

This workshop will introduce SPR attendees to the use of responsive and adaptive survey design (RSD/ASD) techniques for improving the efficiency and quality of longitudinal prevention studies. RSD and ASD are state-of-the-art techniques developed by survey methodologists for increasing the efficiency and representativeness of data collections. After introducing the basic concepts of RSD and ASD, along with essential tools for implementing these techniques in practice, the seminar will continue with the presentation of several case studies illustrating how the use of these techniques has increased the efficiency (in terms of cost and quality of estimates) for longitudinal studies employing a variety of data collection modes. Examples will range from major national studies to small local studies, and participants will have the opportunity to participate in three hands-on group exercises aimed at solidifying approaches to making real-time design decisions in this context. The workshop will also instruct participants in how to make meaning of paradata, or the rich set of data that arise from the process of collecting longitudinal data (e.g., contact attempts, subgroup response rates, etc.), and how these data can be used to inform RSD and ASD.

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Pre-Conference Workshop II (full-day)

Date:     Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Time:    8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Novel Approaches for Public Health Informatics: Integrating and Analyzing Geospatial and Administrative Data (To register select: Health Informatics)

Underwritten by:  NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Co-Chairs/Organizers:

  • Elizabeth M. Ginexi, Ph.D., Health Scientist Administrator, National Institutes of Health
  • Mildred M. Maldonado-Molina, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Health Outcomes & Biomedical Informatics, University of Florida
  • Patricia L. Mabry, Ph.D., Research Investigator, HealthPartners Institute

Presenters:

  • Andrew J. Curtis, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Geography, Kent State University
  • Hye-Chung Kum, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Health Policy & Management, Texas A & M University
  • Jaclyn Hall, Ph.D., Assistant Research Scientist, Health Outcomes & Biomedical Informatics, Faculty, Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida

Description:

Surveys, interviews, and experiments traditionally have been the primary means of data collection for prevention science research studies. We now have data from a number of sources that, while often collected with purposes other than research in mind, can be repurposed to inform studies of human behavior with unprecedented levels of fidelity and precision. These data sources include geospatial or geocoded sources of data and web-based electronic administrative or commercial record keeping databases, such as digital health care administrative data from patients, providers, and insurers. Advances in automated data processing including algorithms from machine learning, text mining, data mining, artificial intelligence and natural language processing, and innovations in computational modeling all present possibilities for utilizing these data sources for public health monitoring, surveillance, or even as platforms for targeting at risk populations with tailored health messaging and personalized real-time interventions and digital experiments.

The technological advances enabled by the creation of geospatial and administrative data streams and context-aware systems and computational modeling are now the focus of an exciting line of public health informatics research. Interdisciplinary digital health intervention research which brings together computer scientists and prevention researchers offers enormous potential to improve public health with broader, more rapid intervention reach for individuals and populations. This preconference workshop will convene experts to showcase innovative methodological approaches to curate, integrate, and analyze administrative and geospatial data. Following didactic morning and afternoon tutorials, workshop attendees will participate in a moderated roundtable dialogue to discuss how these data methods may be applied and refined for future prevention science studies.

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Pre-Conference Workshop III (full-day)

Date:     Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Time:    8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Difficult Dialogues in Prevention Science: Improving Engagement, Research, and Pedagogy on Controversial Topics or with Vulnerable Populations (To register select: Difficult Dialogues)

Organizer: Sarah D. Lynne, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences, University of Florida

Presenters:

  • Sarah D. Lynne, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences, University of Florida
  • Jyotsna Vanapalli, Difficult Dialogues National Resource Center 2018 Conference Chair, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, University of Maryland
  • Antonio Farias, Chief Diversity Officer & Senior Advisor to the President, University of Florida

Description:

Topics relevant to prevention science are part of many of the most heated and controversial public conversations nationally. The momentum for dialogue and action is promising; however, there is a need to ensure that sound empirically informed speech is part of the dialogue. It is also critical to develop our ability and the ability of the next generation of prevention scientists to conduct rigorous science on controversial topics and develop authentic partnerships with diverse and vulnerable populations. In order to do this, we need to develop our ability to engage in respectful, inclusive conversations with diverse audiences on controversial topics from the field of prevention science. The purpose of this workshop is to develop the skills of prevention scientists to engage ethically and authentically with vulnerable populations, communicate respectfully with multiple stakeholder groups, and enhance pedagogy in prevention science training programs related to forming genuine partnerships through effective communication.

Intergroup and Difficult Dialogues incorporate identity formation and articulation, group relationships, and theories of communication to provide a structured approach to difficult issue resolution.  These empirically-based strategies will be used during the workshop activities to facilitate skill building.

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Pre-Conference Workshop IV (full-day)

Date:     Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Time:    8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Prevention through Partnership: Translating Evidence to and from Practice through Research-Practice Partnerships (To register select: Prevention through Partnerships)

Organizer: John R. Seeley, Ph.D., Professor, Special Education and Clinical Sciences, University of Oregon

Presenters:

  • Nicholas J. Parr, MPH, Doctoral Student, Prevention Science, University of Oregon
  • Jonathan L. Rochelle, MS, Doctoral Student, Special Education, University of Oregon
  • Roger Brubaker, MPH, PreventionLane Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Promotion Coordinator, Lane County Public Health
  • Maria L. Schweer-Collins, MA, Doctoral Student, Prevention Science, University of Oregon

Description:

Research-Practice Partnerships (RPPs) are critical avenues for effectively testing and disseminating evidence-based practices to community settings; for establishing and strengthening relationships between scientists, research institutions, and community stakeholders; and for comprehensively evaluating practice implementation (Bryk, Gomez, Grunow, & LeMahieu, 2015; Tseng, Easton, & Supplee, 2017). Despite their promise, RPPs can be challenging to develop and maintain, and require multidisciplinary skillsets to facilitate equitable goal-setting and ongoing collaboration (Palinkas, Short, & Wong, 2015). Building on established RPP frameworks and drawing from hands-on experience implementing statewide RPP efforts in mental health promotion and suicide prevention, this workshop will train prevention researchers on how to form and sustain RPPs under real-world constraints, how to maximize the benefit of RPPs to researchers and practitioners, and how to navigate complex relational, analytic, and communications issues to ensure the success of RPPs for addressing important prevention and public health challenges.

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Pre-Conference Workshop V (half-day)

Date:     Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Time:    1:00 pm – 5:30 pm

How to write a research grant application to the Institute of Education Sciences: (IES) Bringing Prevention Science Ideas to Education Research, Presented by IES, U.S. DOE (To register select: IES grant writing)

Presented by:  Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

Organizer and Presenter: Emily J. Doolittle, Ph.D., Team Leader for Social Behavioral Research in the National Center for Education Research at the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

Description:

This course will provide instruction and advice on writing a successful application to the Institute of Education Sciences’ (IES) Education Research Grants Program (84.305A) and Special Education Research Grants Program (84.324A). The workshop will focus on 1) the research topics that make up these two grant programs, 2) the research goal structure under which these programs operate, and 3) the four sections of the Research Narrative (Significance, Research Plan, Personnel, and Resources) that comprise the most important part of the grant application. This workshop will also focus on two newer requirements for IES grant applications:  to disseminate findings in appropriate ways to a variety of audiences, and to analyze cost and cost effectiveness of education interventions. Consistent with the findings of the SPR Training Needs Assessment Task Force (TNATF), the workshop will highlight opportunities for longitudinal research design and data analysis projects through these grant programs, including the “big” data sets available through IES’ National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) for secondary data analyses.  Direct instruction on these topics will be accompanied by review of examples, application to participants’ own work, and discussion.

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