Home » 2007 Preconference Workshops

2007 Preconference Workshops

SPR provides training opportunities in prevention science during pre-conference workshops scheduled for Tuesday, May 29, 2007. All workshops require registration.

Pre-Conference #1
DATE: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 Hyatt Regency Washington
TIME: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM (Lunch on your own)

Underlying Mechanisms in Liability for Dysregulatory Behaviors
Chairs: Dr. Jenae Neiderhiser, George Washington University, Dr. Diana Fishbein, RTI International

This workshop will clarify how genetic and environmental factors operate together and to discuss the relevance of this to prevention research. Areas covered will be genetic influences (both molecular and quantitative) on relevant behaviors (endophenotypes), interplay of genes and the environment through correlation and interaction, changes in gene expression as a result of changes in the environment and vice versa, etc. The presentations will be focused on describing the methods and interpretation of findings in each area and not on presenting new research. Attendees should expect to actively participate throughout the day with the objective of having a better understanding of how to interpret and potentially use findings in these areas in their own work. More details…

Pre-Conference #2
DATE: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 Hyatt Regency Washington
TIME: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM (Lunch on your own)

Analysis Of Preventive Intervention Data Using Mixture Modeling In Mplus
Presenter: Bengt Muthén, UCLA

This workshop discusses methods for analyzing longitudinal data from preventive interventions. Such studies raise questions of how to analyze: Individual differences in growth over time; Non-normal outcomes for rare behaviors; Intervention effects on trajectories over time; For whom an intervention is effective; Selective drop-out; Intervention effects in the presence of non-compliance; The multilevel nature of an intervention; The power to detect intervention effects. More details…

Pre-Conference #3
DATE: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 Hyatt Regency Washington
TIME: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM (Lunch on your own)

Application of Mixed Models for Longitudinal and Clustered Data Using SuperMix
Presenters: Donald Hedeker and Robert Gibbons, University of Illinois at Chicago, Stephen du Toit, Scientific Software International, Inc..

This workshop will discuss and demonstrate SuperMix. SuperMix combines the functionality of four mixed-effects programs, MIXREG, MIXOR, MIXNO, and MIXPREG, developed by Donald Hedeker and Robert Gibbons into a single application to provide estimates for mixed-effects regression models.

Mixed-effects models are also known as multilevel, hierarchical, or random-effects models. These models can be used for the analysis of longitudinal data, where each individual may be measured at a different number of occasions. They can also be used for clustered data, such as for patients within clinics. More details…

Pre-Conference #4
DATE: Tuesday, May 29, 2007 Hyatt Regency Washington
TIME: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM (Lunch on your own)

Using Tested Programs in the Real World—Strategies and Tools to Promote Implementation Fidelity
Presenters: Sharon Mihalic, M.A., Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, University of Colorado, William B. Hansen, PhD, President, Tanglewood Research, Abigail A. Fagan, PhD, Social Development Research Group, University of Washington

As SPR promotes the broad dissemination of tested and effective programs in real world settings, implementing programs with fidelity becomes even more important, for both scientists and practitioners. This workshop is designed to build knowledge, skills and tools for moving tested and effective programs to real world application while replicating their original study design. The workshop targets program developers and prevention researchers, with the goals of ensuring that participants will: (1) Understand the importance of achieving implementation fidelity of tested programs; (2) Agree upon common elements of implementation fidelity and discuss ways of measuring these elements; (3) Discuss the pros and cons of when and how to adapt programs to the local situation; (4) Identify general models, tools and strategies that promote implementation fidelity; (5) Develop tools and strategies to promote implementation fidelity for specific programs. More details…