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Pre-Conference Workshops and International Networking Forum

The Society for Prevention Research provides training opportunities in prevention science during pre-conference workshops scheduled for Tuesday, May 26, 2015.  All workshops require registration.

Please note Pre-Conference Workshop II has been CANCELLED: Developing a protocol for a Cochrane systematic review, and introduction to the Cochrane systematic review software, “Revman” Organizer and Presenter: David R. Foxcroft, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford UK.

separator1Pre-Conference (PC) Workshops

  • PC Workshop I, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm, Implementing Parent Training at Scale in Child Welfare with Linked Policy, Fiscal, and Practice Reforms (learn more)
  • PC Workshop II, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm, Developing a protocol for a Cochrane systematic review, and introduction to the Cochrane systematic review software, “Revman” (learn more)
  • PC Workshop III, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm, Getting SMART: Experimental Design Methods for Developing Adaptive Interventions (learn more)
  • PC Workshop IV, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm, Modern Mediation Analysis (learn more)

International Networking Forum

International Task Force Meet and Greet

Date:  Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Time: 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm

International Networking Forum

Date:  Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Time: 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

The International Networking Forum is designed to bring together colleagues who are working in the international arena on prevention science research, programs, and policies.  This is an interactive forum and it is not a workshop nor a didactic session; rather it is an effort to foster international collaboration in pursuit of promoting prevention science world-wide.  Participation is key to the forum.  The forum is sponsored by the International Task Force and each year, projects are addressed that will further the underlying goal of supporting and networking colleagues who work in the international arena.

NIDA International Poster Session and Reception

Date:  Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

The International Program and Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research (DESPR) of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) will host the 8th Annual NIDA International SPR Poster Session. The poster session will take place in conjunction with the SPR opening reception. Posters will highlight drug and alcohol abuse prevention research, including research on drug-related HIV/AIDS prevention. The research presentations will have been conducted in international settings by international researchers, domestic researchers, or bi-national teams.

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Pre-Conference Workshop I

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Implementing Parent Training at Scale in Child Welfare with Linked Policy, Fiscal, and Practice Reforms

Organizer: Patricia Chamberlain, PhD, Oregon Social Learning Center

Presenters
Bryan Samuels, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago
Patricia Chamberlain, PhD, Oregon Social Learning Center
Marion Forgatch, PhD, Implementation Sciences International, Inc.
Fred Wulczyn, PhD, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago
Sara Wolf-Feldman, PhD, Chapin Hall, University of Chicago
Lisa Saldana, PhD, Oregon Social Learning Center
John Landsverk, PhD, Oregon Social Learning Center

Description

During the past 5 years, there have been significant opportunities to successfully implement a policy and practice agenda to improve social, emotional, physical, and educational outcomes for children and families in child welfare. Under the leadership of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,the role of academic research on child welfare practice was elevated as was the importance of child well-being as a primary outcome of concern for child welfare practice. This included the goal of addressing the long-term impact of maltreatment and associated poor outcomes commonly reported in research involving foster youth. Policy initiatives have called for child welfare systems to be proactive in using research to enhance their capacities for making informed policy and program decisions using scientific evidence. This work emphasizes the emergence of a cutting-edge body of scholarship in evidence-based interventions and neuroscience and the potential for innovative contributions to understanding the effects of maltreatment on child development.

An example of a large-scale foster care reform that linked policy, fiscal incentives, and evidence-based interventions will be described. The goal was to achieve a reduction in the following outcomes: a) placement disruptions (lateral moves); b) the number of placement days; length of stay; and c) the number of re-entries in to care. Achieving 20% reductions in these targets would make the reform effort cost-neutral. Two evidence-based interventions were chosen by the child welfare system in a large urban city to achieve these targets: KEEP (Keeping foster and kinship parents trained and supported) and PMTO (Parenting Through Change to support and increase skills of biological parents). These interventions were linked in that they are based on the same theory (social learning), used similar intervention components, used an observation-based fidelity monitoring system, and the training and ongoing consultation of case workers and supervisors were coordinated. The start-up time for this system reform was rapid: 5 months from conceptualization, design, agency selection, planning/readiness, and installation of fidelity monitoring system design. This presented numerous challenges for the implementation.

A multiple baseline study designed to detect whether, relative to the past, performance differed from what would have been expected under a business as usual design. Innovative strategies were used for establishing what was likely to happen as a counterfactual against which to compare what did happen. The evaluation methodology and results will be described.

Objectives

a) To offer participants a conceptual framework that aligns policy and fiscal incentives to optimize the impact of parent mediated clinical interventions.
b) To demonstrate methods for training the frontline workforce to implement theoretically linked interventions.
c) To use existing administrative data to conduct a multiple-baseline evaluation of at-scale impacts.
d) To “pull down” key intervention components into daily interactions between supervisors, caseworkers, parents, and children to affect routine practice.

For more information on PC Workshop I, download PDF here.

separator1Pre-Conference Workshop II – cancelled

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Developing a protocol for a Cochrane systematic review, and introduction to the Cochrane systematic review software, “Revman”

Organizer and Presenter: David R. Foxcroft, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford UK.

Description

The Cochrane Collaboration, established in 1993, is an international, non-profit, independent organisation, established to ensure that up-to-date information about the effects of healthcare interventions is readily available worldwide. The Collaboration aims to introduce scientific rigour to minimise bias into the systematic review process by utilising an explicit and reproducible methodology. Cochrane reviews are particularly relevant and useful to public policy making. The purpose of this workshop is to introduce the Cochrane review process and tool, giving participants the opportunity to begin developing their own review question and Cochrane review protocol, and to encourage researchers to progress to undertaking a full Cochrane review. Specific learning objectives are:

  • To understand the rationale and status of Cochrane reviews, especially with regard to public policy making
  • To understand the rationale and format of a protocol for Cochrane systematic review
  • To be able to develop a Cochrane review protocol, covering the following components: Formulation of the background and the question; Locating and selecting appropriate studies; Appraising trial quality; and Planning the methods of the review
  • To understand how to interact with and navigate the Cochrane review manager software, “Revman”, with a focus on Cochrane risk of bias assessment.

NB This workshop will not cover meta-analytic methods.

For more information on PC Workshop II, download PDF here.

separator1Pre-Conference Workshop III

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Getting SMART: Experimental Design Methods for Developing Adaptive Interventions

Presenters:
Daniel Almirall, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, Survey Research Center, University of Michigan
Billie Nahum-Shani. PhD, Research Assistant Professor, Survey Research Center, University of Michigan

Description

The prevention and management of many health disorders often entails a sequential, individualized approach whereby intervention is adapted and re-adapted over time in response to the specific needs and evolving status of the individual. Adaptive interventions provide one way to operationalize the strategies (e.g., continue, augment, switch, step-down) leading to individualized sequences of treatment. An adaptive intervention is a sequence of decision rules that specify whether, how or when (timing), and based on which measures, to alter the dosage (duration, frequency or amount), type, or delivery of treatments in the course of an individual or patient’s care. Often, a wide variety of critical questions must be answered when developing a high-quality adaptive intervention. Yet, there is often insufficient empirical evidence or theoretical basis to address these questions. The Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial (SMART)—a type of experimental design—was developed explicitly for the purpose of building efficacious adaptive interventions. SMARTs represent an attractive alternative to the standard randomized clinical trial when the overarching aim is to construct (as opposed to evaluate) a high-quality adaptive intervention.

Learning objectives of workshop: The learning objectives of this one-day pre-conference workshop are to (a) provide an introduction to adaptive interventions and (b) help you to gain the background you need to use the SMART design.

For more information on PC Workshop II, download PDF here.

separator1Pre-Conference Workshop IV

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Modern Mediation Analysis

Presenters:
David P. MacKinnon, Ph.D., Foundation Professor, Department of Psychology, Arizona State University
Yasemin Kisbu-Sakarya, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey

Description

The goal of the workshop is to describe statistical, methodological, and conceptual aspects of mediation analysis. The one-day workshop consists of four parts. Part 1, covers definitions, history, and applications for the mediation model. The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of the research questions the mediation model can answer. Examples from mediation analysis in prevention and treatment research are described. In Part II, the conceptual model described in Part I is quantified in the estimation of mediation in single and multiple mediator models. Estimation of mediation effects including assumptions, statistical tests, confidence intervals, and effect size are covered. The methods described in this section serve as the foundation for more advanced methods in Part III consisting of mediation in path analysis, longitudinal mediation models, and mediation in the context of moderation. In Part IV, general practical and theoretical issues in the investigation of mediation are discussed including methods to adjust for confounders, causal inference, additional approaches to identifying mediating variables, and future directions.

For more information on PC Workshop IV, download PDF here.