Home » 2020 ANNUAL MEETING » *Pre-Conference Workshops

*Pre-Conference Workshops

Registration will open the week of February 10.

Pre-Conference (PC) Workshops

The Society for Prevention Research provides training opportunities in prevention science during pre-conference workshops scheduled for Tuesday, May 26, 2020. All workshops require registration.

  1. PC Workshop I (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:30 pm, Synthesis of Datasets to Understand Risk and Prevention of Important Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Health Outcomes. (To register select: Synthesis of Datasets). Registration rates for PC I are discounted by 75%. Discounted rate underwritten by NIH/Office of Disease Prevention.
  2. PC Workshop II (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:00 pm, Towards a Queer Prevention Science: Strategies for Meaningfully and Ethically Including LGBTQ+ People in Prevention Science Research and Interventions. (To register select: LGBTQ+ People in Prevention) Registration rates for PC II are discounted by 75%. Discounted rate underwritten by NIH/Office of Disease Prevention.
  3. PC Workshop III (full-day), 8:30 am – 5:00 pm, Photovoice for Social Action and Social Justice. Promoting Cultural Competence and Place-Based Prevention Science. (To register select: Photovoice)
  4. PC Workshop IV (full-day), 8:30 pm – 5:00 pm, Translating Prevention Science into Action: A Roadmap to Successful Prevention Researcher-State Agency-Community Collaborations. (To register select: Translating Prevention Science)
  5. PC Workshop V (full-day), 8:30 am – 3:45 pm, Community Partnered Research to Promote Health Equity. (To register select: Community Partnered Research)

Pre-conference Workshop Registration Rates

Registration Type Early Bird On or Before 5/1/2020 Full Registration On or Before 5/22/2020 Onsite
PC Workshops I and II (Discounted rate underwritten by NIH/Office of Disease Prevention), Member and Non-Member $37.50 $43.75  

$50

PC Workshops I and II (Discounted rate underwritten by NIH/Office of Disease Prevention, Student (Member and Non-Member) $18.75 $25 $31.25
PC Workshops III-V, Member and Non-Member $150 $175 $200
PC Workshops III-V, Student (Member and Non-Member) $75 $100 $125

Pre-Conference Workshop I (full-day)

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Time: 8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Synthesis of Datasets to Understand Risk and Prevention of Important Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Health Outcomes (To register select: Synthesis of Datasets)

Underwritten by: NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Organizers

  • Crystal L. Barksdale, PhD, MPH, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health
  • Rebecca Kurikeshu George, MPH, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health
  • Eve E. Reider, PhD, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health
  • Belinda E. Sims, PhD, National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse

Discussants

  • Arin Connell, PhD, Case Western Reserve University
  • Dorothy Espelage, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • George W. Howe, George Washington University

Presenters

  • Jennifer Bailey, Ph.D., University of Washington
  • Jeffrey A. Bridge, PhD, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital
  • Hendricks Brown, PhD, Northwestern University
  • George W. Howe, PhD, George Washington University
  • Rick Kosterman, PhD, University of Washington
  • David MacKinnon, PhD, Arizona State University
  • Rashelle Musci, PhD, Johns Hopkins University
  • Manual Ocasio, PhD, Tulane University
  • Tatiana Perrino, PsyD, University of Miami School of Medicine
  • Bobbi Jo Yarborouogh, PsyD, Kaiser Foundation Research Institute
  • Fred Wulczyn, PhD, Chapin Hall at The University of Chicago

Description:

There is a growing body of literature reporting on the benefits of preventive interventions for substance abuse and internalizing/externalizing behaviors, delivered in childhood on the long-term outcomes of mental health and reduced substance use. Findings from this research demonstrate that (1) intervening early in development and targeting proximal risk and protective factors can have an impact on a broad array of distal outcomes; and (2) preventive interventions can have unanticipated beneficial effects on outcomes not specifically targeted by the intervention (cross-over effects). Indeed, there is a small body of evidence providing proof of concept that preventive interventions aimed at reducing a number of risk factors for suicide (e.g., substance use, externalizing, and internalizing behavior) can prevent suicidal ideation and behaviors. New technological and analytic approaches for harmonizing/integrating data sets hold potential for increasing statistical power and facilitating the detection of the risk and protective factors for important mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) health outcomes, and impact of prevention interventions, in general, and on important subgroups (e.g., sexual minority youth, racial/ethnic minority youth) and in the case of low base rate behaviors (e.g., suicidal behaviors, psychosis).

The purpose of this workshop is to encourage research to integrate/harmonize existing data sets from preventive intervention trials implemented early in life and administrative data (e.g., national death index, child welfare, criminal justice, etc.) to: 1) examine risk and protective factors relevant to later mental health outcomes in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood that could become targets of prevention; and 2) determine whether preventive interventions delivered earlier in life have long-term effects, and cross-over effects (e.g., unanticipated beneficial effects), on important MEB health outcomes.

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Pre-Conference Workshop II (full-day)

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Time: 8:30 am – 5:30 pm

Towards a Queer Prevention Science: Strategies for Meaningfully and Ethically Including LGBTQ+ People in Prevention Science Research and Interventions (To register select: LGBTQ+ People in Prevention)

Underwritten by: NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Organizer: Robert Marx, PhD, San Jose State University

Presenters:

  • Robert Marx, PhD, San Jose State University
  • Jessica N. Fish, University of Maryland
  • Nicholas J. Parr, MS, MPH, University of Oregon
  • Hardian Thamrin, BA, Arizona State University

Description:

Recent research has demonstrated the dearth of prevention strategies developed for and implemented with sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth (Coulter et al., 2019) and older adults (Fredricksen-Goldsen et al., 2017), including those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ+). At the same time, research on prevention programs has frequently failed to consider the differential outcomes for SGM participants, even though health disparities are well documented. As the field continues to focus on the importance of context and achieving health equity, prevention scientists are uniquely positioned to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that target–or at minimum include and measure–SGM individuals, which will aid in the examination of differential experiences within universal prevention programs.

In order to lead the field forward, prevention scientists need a strong understanding of the contextual factors that contribute to SGM-related health disparities, culturally competent methods for enhancing participating of SGM individuals their research, and nuanced approaches to study design that more comprehensively assess factors relevant to the wellbeing SGM people. To that end, this workshop will provide prevention scientists with the foundational knowledge to begin to meaningfully and ethically include SGM individuals in their research and interventions. The workshop will begin with a strong theoretical grounding in the contexts and environments that shape SGM individuals’ experiences and observed health disparities. This foundation will inform the methodological discussions to follow, which will center on research design, including the ethical recruitment of SGM participants the selection of appropriate demographic measures that more fully capture SGM identities, and the inclusion of measures that assess for risk and protective factors and outcomes conceptually rooted in minority stress theory. We will also overview key considerations related to adaptation and design of interventions serving SGM populations. Discussion activities throughout the workshop will be interlinked and will guide participants through real-world applications of workshop topics including study recruitment and measure selection.

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Pre-Conference Workshop III (full-day)

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Photo Voice for Social Action & Social Justice. Promoting Cultural Competence & Place-Based Prevention Science.

Organizer: Susana Helm, PhD, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Presenters:

  • Kumu Kanoelani Davis, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Kammy Purdy, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Jackie Ng-Osorio, DrPH, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Mapuana Antonio, DrPH, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Description:

The purpose of this workshop is to provide guided experiential learning of PhotoVoice, a technique for promoting social justice and social action through collaboration with community members (spatial communities, relational communities) by using photography to voice their concerns, identify solutions, and address power imbalances. We have aligned the learning objectives to the SPR 2020 conference theme, “Why context matters. Towards a place-based preventions science”.

  1. Learning Objective: Develop knowledge and understanding of basic photovoice principles.
  2. Learning Objective: Critically experience and analyze a PhotoVoice technique that emphasizes culture.
  3. Learning Objective: Develop knowledge and apply skill, including ethical practice, for using photography as a social justice tool.
  4. Learning Objective: Learn and use a PhotoVoice facilitation technique by emphasizing place & context, and communicate effectively regarding analysis of photo aesthetics in relation to social justice.
  5. Learning Objective: Synthesize the workshop activities by developing project-specific knowledge for using photovoice to promote cultural competence and place-based prevention science.
  6. Learning Objective: Comprehend the value of incorporating culture in all aspects of PhotoVoice from opening to closing activity.

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Pre-Conference Workshop IV (full-day)

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Translating Prevention Science into Action: A Roadmap to Successful Prevention Researcher-State Agency-Community Collaborations ((To register select: Translating Prevention Science)

Organizer: Brittany Cooper, PhD, Washington State University

Presenters:

  • Brittany Cooper, PhD, Washington State University
  • Louise Parker, PhD, Washington State University
  • Gitanjali Shrestha, MA, ABD, Washington State University
  • Sarah Mariani, Washington State Health Care Authority
  • Erin Kelly, DrPH, MA, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Marc Morgan, Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment
  • Nathaniel Riggs, PhD, Colorado State University
  • David Arnold, NASPA
  • Jochebed Gayles, PhD, Pennsylvania State University
  • Roger Spaw, Pennsylvania State University
  • Geoff Kolchin, Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency

Description:

The Society for Prevention Research is “dedicated to advancing scientific investigation on the etiology and prevention of social, physical and mental health, and academic problems and on the translation of that information to promote health and well-being [emphasis added].” This call for translating science into action comes not only from prevention researchers, but also from representatives from those public systems – especially at the state level – whose day-to-day job it is to effectively use taxpayer dollars to provide services that improve youth, family, and community health and well-being. Given our common goals, it only makes sense for prevention researchers, state agency leaders, and community providers to work together to bring science to bear on our most pressing public health problems. The value of these collaborations has been highlighted in two recent SPR Mapping Advances in Prevention Science Task Forces (Fagan et al., in press; Leadbeater, 2018). Fortunately, numerous models/frameworks have recently emerged to help identify and guide the structural and procedural approaches to successful, mutually beneficial, research-practice-policy partnerships. However, many of these models/frameworks are narrowly focused within specific systems (e.g., education, child welfare), rather than designed to generalize across systems. Because prevention is housed within and across multiple public systems, this workshop aims to distill from the academic literature and through four case study examples across three states, the common elements needed to lay the groundwork for creating and maintaining successful prevention researcher-state agency-community collaborations.

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Pre-Conference Workshop V (full-day)

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Time: 8:30 am – 3:45 pm

Community Partnered Research to Promote Health Equity

Organizer: Anna Ettinger, PhD, MPH, MSW, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Presenters:

  • Val Chavis, Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh
  • Anna Ettinger, PhD, MPH, MSW, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • Erricka Hager, MPH, University of Pittsburgh Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI)
  • Jada Shirriel, MSPPM, Healthy Start of Pittsburgh
  • Michael Sider-Rose, PhD, Coro Center for Civic Leadership

Description:

Addressing health disparities requires innovative community-based research, prevention, and intervention approaches to build collective strength. This workshop describes a community building approach to reducing disparities in Allegheny County through The Pittsburgh Study (TPS), a longitudinal, community partnered intervention study spanning pregnancy through adolescence that aims to understand and optimize child health and thriving. Through this applied example and a combination of individual and group-based experiential learning methods, this workshop will address several key themes for community partnered research, including building equitable, ethical partnerships with historically disadvantaged communities, strengthening community partnerships through shared decision-making, and co-producing prevention research goals and interventions with communities. The learning objectives for workshop participants are to:

  1. Describe current frameworks of community engagement focusing on cultural humility and building community assets and collaborations (Session 1).
  2. Explain how context powerfully shapes health and how to integrate contextual influences into research (Session 2).
  3. Utilize tools to ethically and equitably build research partnerships through leadership and training (Sessions 3 and 4).
  4. Assess current measures of community engagement and develop skills in conducting ethical evaluations of community programs (Session 5).

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